FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
  • Can I wear contacts while I tan?
  • As long as you are wearing your FDA approved eyewear, there is no reason why you cannot wear your contact lenses while tanning. However, it is recommended that you use moisturizing drops prior to or just after the tanning session to prevent any temporary discomfort.
  • Can I tan if I am pregnant?
  • There is some concern that the heat build up which inevitably occurs when tanning indoors or outdoors may adversely affect some pregnant women, just as a sauna or Jacuzzi might. For liability reasons, we will only allow a pregnant woman to tan with written permission from her Doctor.
  • Why does my tan fade?
  • Because your tan occurs in the outer layers of the skin, it is eventually lost to your skin’s natural exfoliation process. When the old skin exfoliates it takes with them the darkened melanin that was created by the exposure to light. In order to maintain your tan, you need to continue to expose your skin to UV light.
  • How can I make my tan last longer?
  • Moisturize! Moisturize! Moisturize! Your skin is constantly renewing itself. The dryer your skin, the faster it will want to shed its top layers and bring new skin to the surface. Also, the healthier your skin is the better it tans. Dry layers on the surface of your skin will block the UV rays from getting to the lower layers of your skin where melanin is produced.
  • Why should I use tanning products?
  • The use of an approved indoor tanning product increases your tanning results and promotes healthier skin. Tanning lotions contain ingredients that help the UV light penetrate quicker and more efficiently into the surface of your skin accelerating the production of melanin which in turn is oxidized into your golden brown tan. Please ask one of our knowledgeable associates to help you determine which lotion or oil is appropriate for your skin type.
  • Do I have to wear eyewear when tanning?
  • Tan Pro requires that all tanners wear FDA approved eyewear while tanning. Your eyelids and skin around the eyes is the thinnest skin on our bodies, therefore UV light can easily penetrate that skin to reach our eyes. Therefore, just by closing your eyes you are not properly protecting your eyes. Repeated exposure to UV light can cause long‐term damage to your eyes.